You’re Invited to Watch Cargo Launch to the International Space Station

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Watch Northrop Grumman’s Space Station Launch 
What do radishes, a space toilet, and contained fire experiments have in common? They are launching next week on a Northrop Grumman resupply mission to the International Space Station.

Loaded with nearly 8,000 pounds of research, commercial products, crew supplies, and hardware, the Cygnus cargo spacecraft is targeted to launch on the company’s Antares rocket at 10:27 p.m. EDT, Tuesday, Sept. 29 from our Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The Cygnus spacecraft, dubbed the SS Kalpana Chawla, will arrive at the space station Saturday, Oct. 3.
Northrop Grumman's CRS-14 Mission to the International Space Station: What's on Board
Virtual Launch Event – Register for email updates or RSVP to the Facebook event to let us know you’ll be watching launch and to receive any schedule updates, related activities, and access to curated resources.

View from the Mid-Atlantic Region – The launch may be visible, weather permitting, to residents throughout the mid-Atlantic region and possibly the East Coast of the United States.
Find Out How To Watch Live
This Week in Space
Economic Impact – This week, we released our first agencywide Economic Impact Report. NASA supports 312,000 American jobs and $64 billion in economic output each year. We’re on our way to the Moon by 2024, but you can see our economic impact here and now.
Read the Report
Countdown to Touch-and-Go – A historic moment is on the horizon for our OSIRIS-REx mission. On Oct. 20, the robotic spacecraft will make its first attempt to contact the surface of asteroid Bennu and collect a sample. The spacecraft is scheduled to return the sample to Earth in 2023.
Watch the Mission Trailer
We Are Going – The Artemis program is well underway! Following a series of critical contract awards and hardware milestones, we’re sharing an update on our Phase 1 plans to land the first woman and the next man on the surface of the Moon in 2024.
Read the Artemis Plan
Artemis Generation Coders – We’re launching our next App Development Challenge on Sept. 30. In this coding challenge, middle and high school students work in teams to develop an app that visualizes the South Pole region of the Moon.
Sign Up for the App Challenge
Student Explorers – Join the Artemis Generation at SciFest, a virtual expo from the USA Science and Engineering Festival. The free event, which runs from Sept. 26 to Oct. 3, features NASA experts discussing topics related to science, technology, engineering and math.
Register for the Event
Collaborations in Space – We’re building on our longstanding partnership with the Department of Defense. This week, we announced an agreement with United States Space Force to collaborate in human spaceflight, U.S. space policy, planetary defense, and more.
Learn About the New Agreement
People Spotlight
Meet María-José Viñas Garcia, the Spanish Communications Lead for Science at NASA HQ.

“We are not just increasing the amount of Spanish content coming out of NASA — we are highlighting the work of the Hispanic workforce. I think it’s important to show that we have very strong role models at NASA for those kids who might dream of becoming astronauts or work in STEM.”
Ciencia de la NASA
Image Spotlight
Floating serenely in the sky, the Moon presents an enticing target for photographers on Earth.

This weekend, come together with fellow Moon enthusiasts and curious people worldwide on International Observe the Moon Night on Sept. 26. Everyone on Earth is invited to learn about lunar science and exploration, take part in celestial observations, and honor cultural and personal connections to the Moon.

Image Credit: Scott Hull
Explore NASA
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