Got nerve pain? Avoid THIS drug (suicide, overdose, car accidents)

Create: 2020-07-13
Update: 2020-07-13
Score: 9
Safe: No
Outbound domains: www.nerveshield.buzz


Does THIS common drug make the burning pain of raw and angry nerves even worse?

You won’t believe how popular it is... (Big Pharma rakes in $4.6 billion a year from it and the FDA just approved 9 generic versions last month!)

This is urgent. A June 2019 study from The BMJ on 191,973 neuropathy sufferers found THIS medication is linked to suicide, unintentional overdose, and traffic accidents.

Now, here’s where it gets really interesting...

As soon as you throw it in the trash (and replace it with this 15 second habit), the opposite happens: the constant numbness, burning pain, and “pins and needles” become distant memories...

Find out more right now:


























erfly adults are characterized by their four scale-covered wings, which give the Lepidoptera their name (Ancient Greek λεπίς lepís, scale + πτερόν pterón, wing). These scales give butterfly wings their colour: they are pigmented with melanins that give them blacks and browns, as well as uric acid derivatives and flavones that give them yellows, but many of the blues, greens, reds and iridescent colours are created by structural coloration produced by the micro-structures of the scales and hairs.[10][11][12][13] As in all insects, the body is divided into three sections: the head, thorax, and abdomen. The thorax is composed of three segments, each with a pair of legs. In most families of butterfly the antennae are clubbed, unlike those of moths which may be threadlike or feathery. The long proboscis can be coiled when not in use for sipping nectar from flowers.[14] Nearly all butterflies are diurnal, have relatively bright colours, and hold their wings vertically above their bodies when at rest, unlike the majority of moths which fly by night, are often cryptically coloured (well camouflaged), and either hold their wings flat (touching the surface on which the moth is standing) or fold them closely over their bodies. Some day-flying moths, such as the hummingbird hawk-moth,[15] are exceptions to these rules.[14][16] Sexual dimorphism in Anthocharis cardamines Anthocharis cardamines Weinsberg 20080424.jpg Male Anthocharis cardamines female (5709794696).jpg Female Butterfly larvae, caterpillars, have a hard (sclerotised) head with strong mandibles used for cutting their food, most often leaves. They have cylindrical bodies, with ten segments to the abdomen, generally with short prolegs on segments 3–6 and 10; the three pairs of true legs on the thorax have five segments each.[14] Many are well camouflaged; others are aposematic with bright colours and bristly projections containing toxic chemicals obtained from their food plants. The pupa or chrysalis, unlike that of moths, is not wrapped in a cocoon.[14] Many butterflies are sexually dimorphic. Most butterflies have the ZW sex-determination system where females are the heterogametic sex (ZW) and males homogametic (ZZ).[17] Distribution and migration See also: Lists of butterflies of Australia (Tasmania, Victoria), Britain, India, Menorca, North America, Taiwan, and Trinidad and Tobago Further information: Lepidoptera migration, Insect migration, and Animal navigation Butterflies are distributed worldwide except Antarctica, totalling some 18,500 species.[18] Of these, 775 are Nearctic; 7,700 Neotropical; 1,575 Palearctic; 3,650 Afrotropical; and 4,800 are distributed across the combined Oriental and Australian/Oceania regions.[18] The monarch butterfly is native to the Americas, but in the nineteenth century or before, spread across the world, and is now found in Australia, New Zealand, other parts of Oceania, and the Iberian Peninsula. It is not clear how it dispersed; adults may have been blown by the wind or larvae or pupae may have been accidentally transp
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